Feeling Tired And Run-Down? You Could Be Lacking Magnesium

Feeling Tired And Run-Down? You Could Be Lacking Magnesium

This dietary element is critical to your energy levels
Who hasn't felt a little run-down from time to time? You need your body to perform to its highest level if you're going to make it through life, which means that you want to ensure that you're getting all of the nutrition that your body needs. One mineral that many people may be lacking is magnesium, which is closely tied to your energy levels. 
 
Magnesium releases enzymes in your body, and is used to produce and transport energy in your blood cells. Magnesium deprivation results in lethargy, confusion, fatigue, insomnia, and apathy - all symptoms which are insidious, in that most of us are inclined to blame ourselves for these failings, when it could just be a simple case of nutritional problems!

The standard magnesium recommendations are 310-320mg per day for adult women, and 400-420mg per day for adult men. You may need more or less depending on your age and physical demands - pregnant women, for example, should get 310-360mg.
 
If you are thinking about reaching for a supplement, use caution. Taking too much magnesium can result in diarrhea. In fact, magnesium is commonly taken as a laxative as treatment for constipation. And it doesn't take too much to do the trick: one dose of Phillips Milk of Magnesia contains 500mg magnesium, and produces laxative effects within 1-6 hours.
 
As with most nutritional elements, it's better to get your magnesium from food, particularly because magnesium is found in foods that you should be eating anyway!
 
Dietary sources of magnesium include green leafy vegetables, bananas, almonds, cashews, peas and beans, soy products, and whole grains. Seeds and nuts are one of the best sources of magnesium: half a cup of almonds or cashews contains 200mg, a quarter cup of pumpkin seeds contains a whopping 190mg, and a quarter cup of sunflower seeds contains 113mg.
 
Magnesium deficiency is related to calcium levels as well. If you are not getting enough calcium, it may be difficult for your body to process magnesium. Some people also believe that the habitual consumption of bottled water over tap can cause a magnesium deficiency, since bottled water is typically devoid of magnesium. 
 
However, it seems more sensible to suggest that people eat more healthy nuts and leafy green vegetables, than to launch a nationwide campaign to have magnesium added to bottled water at the production level. Then again, bottled water is a scam and bad for the environment as well. Just one more reason to drink tap water!