Gluten Free Review: Ancient Harvest Supergrain Pasta

Gluten Free Review: Ancient Harvest Supergrain Pasta

I don't know. It was OK, I guess.

I really hope I'm not the only person in the world who sees the word "quinoa" and can't help but mentally think "Quinn-oa." Even though I know it's pronounced "keen-wa," I can never seem to shake that initial impression.

So here we are with some keen-wa pasta. This was my first foray into gluten free pasta, and… I don't know. It was okay, I guess. As with so many gluten free things, a certain percentage of your enjoyment will be dictated by the toppings. 
 
If you are the sort of person who enjoys pasta as plain as possible, with just butter and garlic and maybe a dash of parsley, this may not be the product for you. But if you want to dump a bunch of red sauce on a bowl of spaghetti and call it Italian Night, then you have to realize that the pasta itself is basically just a carrier for the actual good stuff.
 
This particular gluten free pasta is made with quinoa mixed with corn flour. This creates a pasta with a very yellowish cast, and the packaging warns you that the boiling water may turn a bit yellow from the corn flour.

The package refers to the pasta as "delicious," which I'm not so sure about. It also says "you'll never go back to plain noodles again," which is true, but certainly not because Ancient Harvest noodles were all that delicious.
 
One thing that surprised me about these noodles is that they required more care than I am used to giving a pot of spaghetti. It seems like somehow over the last 10-20 years, you stopped really having to stir spaghetti noodles. I have usually found that if you give them a good stir once they soften into the water, you're safe to ignore them until the timer goes off.
 
Such is not the case with Ancient Harvest noodles. I cooked these with my usual inattention, and was justly punished for it. Half the noodles clumped up together at the bottom, forming an inedible mass that I had to excise with knife and fork. Lesson learned: stir these noodles!
 
Taste-wise, they were fairly bland. I cooked them al dente; next time I might try cooking them a little bit longer. (Also, stirring.) But you know, once I poured a whole mess of spaghetti sauce over the top, I would never have known the difference.
 
A warning to the budget-conscious shopper: this pasta comes in a package that looks like a regular one-pound box of pasta. However, it is only eight ounces. Calculate the price accordingly.