Gluten Free Review: Domino's Gluten Free Pizza Crust

Gluten Free Review: Domino's Gluten Free Pizza Crust

It's pizza that you can eat without feeling like you're going to die!

Domino's Pizza has been touting a lot of new products lately, from cheesy bread to its Artisan Pizzas. One new feature that it hasn't been promoting in ads (not that I have seen, anyway) is a new gluten free crust. 

Given the prevalence of Domino's locations across the country, this is nothing short of revolutionary for the gluten free crowd. I'm lucky enough to live in an area with an upscale grocery store where I can buy frozen gluten free pizzas. But I'm willing to bet that for at least half of every American going gluten free, Domino's is now their only option for pizza.
 
So how is it? Well let me answer that question with another question: do you really care? I mean, geez, it's pizza! That you can eat! Without feeling like you're going to die! Who's going to quibble over some details?

Currently, their gluten free pizza only comes in one size: small, which is about 10 inches across. It is a crispy style crust, and you can only get regular toppings on it (i.e. not one of the Artisan pizzas or the promotional pizza styles). I ordered one in pepperoni, and one with ham and pineapple.
 
The crispy crust is a little on the dry side, as crispy crusts tend to be. Next time, in order to compensate for the crust's shortcomings, I would order my pizzas with extra sauce, extra cheese, or both. (Related: cheese is delicious and I always wish I had more of it.)
 
Before I tucked into the pizza proper, I started by pulling off some chunks of crust to taste it plain without any toppings. The texture is great: it is smooth, not gritty as some gluten free baked products can be. The taste of the naked crust is a little odd. It almost tastes like sourdough bread. There is a faint chemical aftertaste that reminded me of baking powder. 
 
As such, I recommend balancing it out with stronger flavored toppings. I didn't notice anything amiss with the pepperoni pizza, for example. In the ham and pineapple pizza, the flavors were light enough that there were some detectable odd notes from the crust.
 
But again: who cares? I ate my pizza happily, I felt fine afterward, and I would gladly order it again without a second's hesitation.
 
A note: the crust itself is certified gluten free. However, Domino's is unable to certify their kitchens themselves as gluten free. Thus, they do not recommend this pizza for sufferers of celiac disease, due to the possibility of cross-contamination. It's a "buyer beware" situation.